Category Archives: social issues

Unfiltered 24/7

pierre-soulages-untitled

 Life Without A Filter

by Angela Ragosa

living life without a filter
a filter
for many…
provides a semblance of
self protection

protects them
like a suit of armor

armor
seemingly necessary
in order to breathe easier

a filter
to
calm one’s fear
of
life lived
within a silent scream

living life without a filter
inevitably
leads one to
question

question
what lies behind the curtain
when will the
other shoe drop

what lies down
winding roads
crippled
by
dangerous intersections
and
skewed curves
iconic
near misses
if
turned a blind eye
to
never traveled

life lived without a filter
a
confounding psyche
few possess
and
even
fewer understand

a state of being
for those
if
given a choice
would
cease
to exist

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Moral Dilemma of Self-Driving Cars: Which Lives to Save in a Crash

Autopilot.jpg

Would you ride in a self-driving car that has been programmed to sacrifice its passengers to save the lives of others, in the event of a serious accident?

New research has found that people generally approve of autonomous vehicles (AV) governed by so-called utilitarian ethics, which would seek to minimize the total number of deaths in a crash, even if it means harming people in the vehicle. But it gets more complicated than that. The study, based on surveys of U.S. residents, found that most respondents would not want to ride in these vehicles themselves, and were not in favor of regulations enforcing utilitarian algorithms on driverless cars. Continue reading

Martha Beck’s 7 Steps to Creating the Life You Really Want…

A simple guide to mapping out the journey of your lifetime.

I read this article recently in O Magazine and found it a clever way of practicing introspection. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did…

image

Odysseus just wanted to go to Ithaca. No, not the one in upstate New York—the one in ancient Greece. He dreamed of it the whole seven years he spent trapped on the island of the nymph Calypso. Eventually the pitying gods ordered Calypso to free him, at which point he managed to build a boat and set out on what he hoped would be a brief and pleasant journey.
Ha.
At every turn, Odysseus’s travels were filled with surprises. He conquered monsters at sea only to find worse ones waiting on land. He encountered seductions that sent him half mad with longing. Finally, in the Land of the Dead, he got clear directions from a seer who, oxymoronically enough, was blind.
Does this ring any bells for you? Maybe you, too, feel stranded in your life, awash in a turbulent sea, or lured by the Siren song of a terrifying love. Or maybe you just hope to experience Winnipeg someday, if only for a long weekend. Fortunately, you have your own internal “blind seer”. It can feel its way into the future and draw you a map. I mean literally. Our project today is to help you create a map of your own epic tomorrows—a magically morphing guide that will get more detailed and accurate as you travel.

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Why You Need to Ask More Creative Questions


Image by alpha spirit via BigStock

I love crime dramas, especially ones where the protagonist appears to have a psychological edge over everyone else, such as The Mentalist, Sherlock and Luther.

The way they look at the crime scene from a different perspective and as a result get new insights into the case that ultimately leads them to the villain.

The majority of times what leads the protagonist to get fresh insight is the quality of questions they ask. When I coach my clients, I do so with the understanding that the questions I ask influences the direction of their thinking.

For example, if I ask you “What will ‘X’ get you?” you will tend to think about specific things (more money, less stress, more time). However if I ask you “What will that do for you?” you are more likely to come up with more value based abstract answers (freedom, contentment, acceptance).

The brain is goal seeking

Questions can lead you to more creative insight due to directing your thinking in a way that requires an answer. Your brain is a goal seeking mechanism, so if you ask it a question your prompt it to find an answer. These questions can provide a way of looking at a problem that provides solutions you hadn’t thought about before. Continue reading

What’s Holding You Back?

If traditional methods aren’t working for you, change your perception.

I noticed the training wheels on my son’s bike were no longer touching the ground. He was riding without them. “Let’s take those off,” I said.

“No Daddy, I’m not ready.”

“Sure you are; let’s give it a try.”

After I removed them, he got on the bike, but couldn’t get enough momentum to stay up and fell right over.

“See Daddy, I can’t do it. Put them back on.”

“Let’s try it again, this time I’ll push.” I grabbed the back of the seat and started pushing him. He was pedaling and riding perfectly, and I was having to run as fast as I could to continue holding the seat. “You’re doing it!” I cried. “I’m going to let go now.”

“No Daddy, don’t let go. I can’t do it.”

I let go, and he stopped pedaling. The bike rolled a few more feet, began to wobble, then fell over.

“I can’t do it. Daddy, please put the training wheels back on.”

He couldn’t see what I saw: that he was already riding without them. He was like a circus elephant tied to a stake in the ground. That elephant is strong enough to push over a tree, yet because she was tied to a stake as a baby – when she wasn’t strong enough to pull it up – she continues to believe it can’t be done. Continue reading

Mind Games: Sometimes a White Coat Isn’t Just a White Coat


If you wear a white coat that you believe belongs to a doctor, your ability to pay attention increases sharply. But if you wear the same white coat believing it belongs to a painter, you will show no such improvement.

So scientists report after studying a phenomenon they call enclothed cognition: the effects of clothing on cognitive processes.

It is not enough to see a doctor’s coat hanging in your doorway, said Adam D. Galinsky, a professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, who led the study. The effect occurs only if you actually wear the coat and know its symbolic meaning — that physicians tend to be careful, rigorous and good at paying attention.

The findings, on the Web site of The Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, are a twist on a growing scientific field called embodied cognition. We think not just with our brains but with our bodies, Dr. Galinsky said, and our thought processes are based on physical experiences that set off associated abstract concepts. Now it appears that those experiences include the clothes we wear. Continue reading

Welcome to mindfulmod.com!

My name is GiGi and I will be your official tour guide as you journey along with me through the pages of mindfulod.com.

This blog has been created solely as a daily source for inspiration.

Whether your glass is half full or half empty, pick a topic and read on Brothers & Sisters.

Once again I welcome you to my sweet place in cyberspace.

Mindfully,

GiGi

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Interesting Perspective?

barbie as venus de milo

A new kind of beauty

I’m interested in what we define as beauty, when we choose to create it ourselves. Beauty has always been a currency, and now that we finally have the technological means to mint our own, what choices do we make? Is beauty informed by contemporary culture? By history? Or is it defined by the surgeon’s hand? Can we identify physical trends that vary from decade to decade, or is beauty timeless? When we re-make ourselves, are we revealing our true character, or are we stripping away our very identity? Perhaps we are creating a new kind of beauty. An amalgam of surgery, art, and popular culture? And if so, are the results the vanguard of human induced evolution?

Mr. Toledano

2008-2010

 

When Midlife Seems Just An Empty Plate

By GINIA BELLAFANTE

The New York Times

assets_anorexia_nervosa_2_by_avitalik_800150209

IN her 23 years as a specialist in eating disorders, Dr. Margo Maine has received countless telephone calls from women worried that their teenage daughters might be dieting into a danger zone. But several years ago, Dr. Maine, a psychologist who runs an eating-disorders treatment program with a partner in West Hartford, Conn., noticed a shift in the telephone inquiries.

”Increasingly, our calls began to include a significant number of adults seeking help not for their children but for themselves,” Dr. Maine said. Some of those callers — women in their late 40’s and early 50’s — were relapsing after overcoming eating disorders in their youth, and others were experiencing them for the first time.

Naomi Burton Isaacs, a public relations executive in New York, had been obsessed about her weight most of her life, she said, but it was only at age 45 that her dieting grew extreme and she developed an addiction to laxatives. She swallowed 25 pills a day. Ms. Burton Isaacs, who is 5-foot-9, withered to 105 pounds.

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